Officials report 7 deaths in San Diego attributed to flesh-devouring microorganism associated with black tar heroin usage.

Officers with the San Diego County Well being and Human Providers Company said in a statement on Wednesday that the seven unidentified individuals died from a bacterial infection called myonecrosis. According to the statement, this “flesh eating” infection of soft tissue destroys muscle. The signs include fever, an elevated heart rate, blisters that emit a foul odor, and pale skin that quickly turns black, dark purple, or purple.

STATE HEALTH OPERATORS SAY MAINE SEES FIRST FLU DEATH DURING SEASON

Nine individuals with severe myonecrosis were admitted to hospitals in the county between Oct. 2 and November 24. All of them had injected heroin black tar. Four of the patients were female, while five were male. Officers reported that the victims ranged in age from 19 to 57.

In the statement, the officers warned that illicit drug users — especially those who use black tar heroin – are at an increased risk of developing wound botulism. “A rare, but severe illness that attacks the body’s nerves,” they said.

According to the statement, signs of wound botulism can mimic those of a drug-overdose. These include weak or drooping eyes, blurred vision, dry mouth, slurred speaking, difficulty swallowing, breathing problems, and “progressive paralysis” that starts on the head and moves down the body.

Nine individuals with severe myonecrosis were admitted to hospitals in the county between Oct. 2 and November 24. All of them had injected heroin black tar. Four of the patients were female, while five were male. Officers reported that the victims ranged in age from 19 to 57.
(iStock)

A MAN REACHES MILLIONS OF PEOPLE WITH VIRAL BLOG POST

In October, San Diego County confirmed a minimum of one case involving black tar heroin. Since September’s beginning, Southern California has reported a total of 13 confirmed or possible cases.

According to the Nationwide Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), black tar heroin is “sticky and hard like roofing tar, or like coal, and is produced primarily in Mexico, and purchased in U.S. regions west of the Mississippi River.”

It states that the dark color of illicit drugs is due to “crude processing methods which leave behind impurities.” Black tar heroin can be dissolved or diluted and then injected under the skin, into muscles or veins.

Officers stated that the source of black tar heroin used by some people in San Diego was unknown at this time. They noted an ongoing investigation.

Residents of San Diego who are struggling with drug addiction or substance abuse can call the Entry and Disaster Line (888) 724-6240.

Madeline Farber works as a reporter for Fox Information. You can follow her on Twitter at @MaddieFarberUDK.


Posted

in

by

Tags: